Vaccine Recommendations
for Your Cat

Our Medical Advisory Board is dedicated to compiling the best vaccine combinations to keep your cat healthy, happy and safe.

COMMUNITY CLINIC PRICES

Kitten

Click on the arrows below to learn more about our vaccines.

RECOMMENDED FOR CATS 8 WEEKS OLD

Kitten Pack 1

Kitten Pack 1 is a good place to start for most kittens, but always discuss your pet’s lifestyle with a veterinary professional before deciding on the appropriate care for your kitten.

This package contains the basic feline combination vaccine, a dewormer, and a fecal test to screen for a variety of internal parasites. Keep your kitten indoors and separated from other cats as much as possible throughout the course of the Kitten Series.

PetVet recommends vaccinating and deworming your kitten starting at 8 weeks of age and then every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age.

3-in-1 Vaccine

3-in-1 is also known as ‘FVRCP’ Vaccine – and protects against:

• Feline Panleukopenia Virus (AKA Feline Distemper)
Feline Panleukopenia Virus (causative agent of Feline Distemper) is a widespread and highly contagious viral disease that causes fever, vomiting, diarrhea, immune suppression, anemia and death. The virus affects mostly young cats, although cats of any age may be infected. This disease can be fatal in cats of all age groups. Feline Panleukopenia virus does not affect humans or dogs.

Like Canine parvovirus, Feline panleukopenia virus can live for months in the environment. The virus can be brought into a home on hands, clothes, or shoes. Cats that never leave their home or backyard and have no contact with other exposed cats are still at risk.

• Feline Herpesvirus and Feline Calicivirus
Feline Herpesvirus (causative agent of Feline Infectious Rhinotracheitis) and Feline Calicivirus (causative agent of Feline Influenza) are two of the three feline respiratory infections against which the feline 3-in-1 vaccine protects. The clinical signs of these diseases may include runny eyes, runny nose, ulcers of mouth and tongue, coughing, sneezing, fever, pneumonia, loss of appetite, and inactivity. Secondary bacterial infections can be fatal. Infected cats may harbor the organism for life with persistent or recurrent disease.

These diseases are common and are extremely contagious from cat to cat via infected discharges (e.g. mucus) and infected secretions (e.g. saliva and tears). These diseases do not affect humans or dogs.

Roundworm/Hookworm Dewormer

Throughout much of the U.S., roundworms are far and away the most common intestinal parasites of our pets. These worms can cause a variety of problems including diarrhea, poor coat health, and general failure to thrive. In puppies and kittens roundworm infestation is the most common cause of the pot-bellied appearance. Severe infestation can lead to liver, lung, and brain damage. Roundworms are not only contagious for other pets, but also for humans, especially children via contact with pet feces. The migrating larvae in children can cause serious and tragic disease especially of the eye and brain. Rarely, a puppy or kitten will vomit or pass in his stool an entire adult roundworm. It is approximately 2″ – 10″ long, white, and may look like a piece of spaghetti. Although adult roundworms mainly infest only puppies and kittens, mature dogs and cats can also harbor the parasite in their intestines.

There is a similar roundworm cycle in the cat, but with an important difference. Instead of larvae going from mother cat to kitten in the womb, the transfer takes place in the milk during nursing. Cat roundworm larvae can live in the mother cat’s breast tissue until nursing stimulates the larvae to enter the milk, transferring them into the suckling kitten. This is a liquid oral medication that the vet on site will administer to the pet.

Fecal Test

A fecal test is an intestinal parasite screening; it tests for many different types of intestinal parasites including the most common parasites, Coccidia, Giardia, Whipworm, Hookworm and Roundworm.

We receive test results 2-3 business days after submission of the sample. Results are sent by email (if available) and postal mail. In addition, positive results will be followed up with by a phone call from a HelpDesk representative.

RECOMMENDED FOR CATS 12 WEEKS OLD
Kitten Pack 2

The second of three series for all kittens. In a perfect world nearly every kitten would get Kitten Pack 2 at 12 weeks of age, 4 weeks after Kitten Pack 1, then followed by Kitten Pack 3 at 16 weeks of age. This package includes a booster for the basic feline combination vaccine, a feline leukemia vaccine, and a dewormer.

Discuss your kitten’s lifestyle with a veterinary professional before deciding on the appropriate care.

3-in-1 Vaccine

3-in-1 is also known as ‘FVRCP’ Vaccine – and protects against:

• Feline Panleukopenia Virus (AKA Feline Distemper)
Feline Panleukopenia Virus (causative agent of Feline Distemper) is a widespread and highly contagious viral disease that causes fever, vomiting, diarrhea, immune suppression, anemia and death. The virus affects mostly young cats, although cats of any age may be infected. This disease can be fatal in cats of all age groups.

Feline Panleukopenia virus does not affect humans or dogs.

Like Canine parvovirus, Feline panleukopenia virus can live for months in the environment. The virus can be brought into a home on hands, clothes, or shoes. Cats that never leave their home or backyard and have no contact with other exposed cats are still at risk.

• Feline Herpesvirus and Feline Calicivirus
Feline Herpesvirus (causative agent of Feline Infectious Rhinotracheitis) and Feline Calicivirus (causative agent of Feline Influenza) are two of the three feline respiratory infections against which the feline 3-in-1 vaccine protects. The clinical signs of these diseases may include runny eyes, runny nose, ulcers of mouth and tongue, coughing, sneezing, fever, pneumonia, loss of appetite, and inactivity. Secondary bacterial infections can be fatal. Infected cats may harbor the organism for life with persistent or recurrent disease.

These diseases are common and are extremely contagious from cat to cat via infected discharges (e.g. mucus) and infected secretions (e.g. saliva and tears). These diseases do not affect humans or dogs.

Feline Leukemia

Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is transmitted from cat to cat via saliva and nasal mucus. It is also commonly transmitted directly from an infected mother to her kittens. Cats in direct contact with one another are the most likely to transmit the disease. This virus suppresses a cat’s immune system much like AIDS disease does in humans.

The signs of FeLV are therefore varied and often reflect secondary diseases that develop due to the FeLV-infected cat’s compromised immune system. The most common signs are fever, anemia, appetite loss, and inactivity. Treatment of the disease may help for a while, but it is eventually fatal.

FeLV does not affect people or dogs.

The disease can affect cats of any age but is especially common in the young and the old. Approximately 1 or 2 cats out of any 100 visibly healthy cats have the feline leukemia virus.
Approximately 99% of cats who carry the virus in their bloodstream will die within 5 years of contracting the virus. (Approximately 50% succumb within 6 months.) In other words, a cat with FeLV may appear normal and be contagious to other cats for up to five years after contracting the virus.

Roundworm/Hookworm Dewormer

Throughout much of the U.S., roundworms are far and away the most common intestinal parasites of our pets. These worms can cause a variety of problems including diarrhea, poor coat health, and general failure to thrive. In puppies and kittens roundworm infestation is the most common cause of the pot-bellied appearance. Severe infestation can lead to liver, lung, and brain damage. Roundworms are not only contagious for other pets, but also for humans, especially children via contact with pet feces. The migrating larvae in children can cause serious and tragic disease especially of the eye and brain. Rarely, a puppy or kitten will vomit or pass in his stool an entire adult roundworm. It is approximately 2″ – 10″ long, white, and may look like a piece of spaghetti. Although adult roundworms mainly infest only puppies and kittens, mature dogs and cats can also harbor the parasite in their intestines.

There is a similar roundworm cycle in the cat, but with an important difference. Instead of larvae going from mother cat to kitten in the womb, the transfer takes place in the milk during nursing. Cat roundworm larvae can live in the mother cat’s breast tissue until nursing stimulates the larvae to enter the milk, transferring them into the suckling kitten. This is a liquid oral medication that the vet on site will administer to the pet.

Add Fecal Test

A fecal test is an intestinal parasite screening; it tests for many different types of intestinal parasites including the most common parasites, Coccidia, Giardia, Whipworm, Hookworm and Roundworm.

RECOMMENDED FOR CATS 16 WEEKS OLD
Kitten Pack 3

This is often the final package for kittens and will generally take place at 16 weeks of age.

If your kitten has received sufficient boosters for their Kitten Series, then future vaccinations should take place annually, or as recommended by your veterinarian.

If your kitten receives all three packages before 16 weeks of age, then PetVet recommends getting one final 3-in-1 vaccine in 3-4 weeks. Rabies vaccines do not require a 3-4 week booster after the first vaccination and only need to be done once during the Kitten Series.

NOTE: Individual state laws determine minimum age for feline rabies.

3-in-1 Vaccine

3-in-1 is also known as ‘FVRCP’ Vaccine – and protects against:

• Feline Panleukopenia Virus (AKA Feline Distemper)
Feline Panleukopenia Virus (causative agent of Feline Distemper) is a widespread and highly contagious viral disease that causes fever, vomiting, diarrhea, immune suppression, anemia and death. The virus affects mostly young cats, although cats of any age may be infected. This disease can be fatal in cats of all age groups. Feline Panleukopenia virus does not affect humans or dogs.

Like Canine parvovirus, Feline panleukopenia virus can live for months in the environment. The virus can be brought into a home on hands, clothes, or shoes. Cats that never leave their home or backyard and have no contact with other exposed cats are still at risk.

• Feline Herpesvirus and Feline Calicivirus
Feline Herpesvirus (causative agent of Feline Infectious Rhinotracheitis) and Feline Calicivirus (causative agent of Feline Influenza) are two of the three feline respiratory infections against which the feline 3-in-1 vaccine protects. The clinical signs of these diseases may include runny eyes, runny nose, ulcers of mouth and tongue, coughing, sneezing, fever, pneumonia, loss of appetite, and inactivity. Secondary bacterial infections can be fatal. Infected cats may harbor the organism for life with persistent or recurrent disease.

These diseases are common and are extremely contagious from cat to cat via infected discharges (e.g. mucus) and infected secretions (e.g. saliva and tears). These diseases do not affect humans or dogs.

PureVax Rabies vaccine

The standard rabies vaccine is effective at preventing rabies virus infection in both dogs and cats. This vaccine has been in existence for many years and is still used in many places for the prevention of rabies in cats. However, while this vaccine has shown very little propensity for causing adverse medical reactions in dogs, there is ample evidence that it can cause cancerous tumors in cats (fibrosarcomas). The chance of a tumor occurring at the injection site is rare, but if it does happen, the prognosis is very poor. Cats that develop these tumors face almost 100% mortality, or may have a limb amputated to avoid spread of the tumor.

Starting in 2010, VIP Petcare started offering the PureVax Feline Rabies vaccine, developed by Merial. This vaccine is non-adjuvanted, meaning it contains less of the various agents believed to cause fibrosarcomas in cats. The PureVax rabies is specifically formulated for cats and has become the standard of care amongst our many veterinary partners.

PetVet Medical Advisory Board has determined that this vaccine represents the “best medicine” for cats and as such, PetVet will only make this vaccine available for the prevention of rabies in our feline clients.

Feline Leukemia

Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is transmitted from cat to cat via saliva and nasal mucus. It is also commonly transmitted directly from an infected mother to her kittens. Cats in direct contact with one another are the most likely to transmit the disease. This virus suppresses a cat’s immune system much like AIDS disease does in humans.

The signs of FeLV are therefore varied and often reflect secondary diseases that develop due to the FeLV-infected cat’s compromised immune system. The most common signs are fever, anemia, appetite loss, and inactivity. Treatment of the disease may help for a while, but it is eventually fatal.

FeLV does not affect people or dogs.

The disease can affect cats of any age but is especially common in the young and the old. Approximately 1 or 2 cats out of any 100 visibly healthy cats have the feline leukemia virus.
Approximately 99% of cats who carry the virus in their bloodstream will die within 5 years of contracting the virus. (Approximately 50% succumb within 6 months.) In other words, a cat with FeLV may appear normal and be contagious to other cats for up to five years after contracting the virus.

Roundworm/Hookworm Dewormer

Throughout much of the U.S., roundworms are far and away the most common intestinal parasites of our pets. These worms can cause a variety of problems including diarrhea, poor coat health, and general failure to thrive. In puppies and kittens roundworm infestation is the most common cause of the pot-bellied appearance. Severe infestation can lead to liver, lung, and brain damage. Roundworms are not only contagious for other pets, but also for humans, especially children via contact with pet feces. The migrating larvae in children can cause serious and tragic disease especially of the eye and brain. Rarely, a puppy or kitten will vomit or pass in his stool an entire adult roundworm. It is approximately 2″ – 10″ long, white, and may look like a piece of spaghetti. Although adult roundworms mainly infest only puppies and kittens, mature dogs and cats can also harbor the parasite in their intestines.

There is a similar roundworm cycle in the cat, but with an important difference. Instead of larvae going from mother cat to kitten in the womb, the transfer takes place in the milk during nursing. Cat roundworm larvae can live in the mother cat’s breast tissue until nursing stimulates the larvae to enter the milk, transferring them into the suckling kitten. This is a liquid oral medication that the vet on site will administer to the pet.

Add Fecal Test

A fecal test is an intestinal parasite screening; it tests for many different types of intestinal parasites including the most common parasites, Coccidia, Giardia, Whipworm, Hookworm and Roundworm.

Cat

ADULT CAT
Adult Cat Pack

Adult cats need regular vaccinations to ensure they keep adequate antibodies to fight off common diseases. Cat vaccines are generally recommended to be done annually, but speak with a veterinary professional before deciding on the appropriate care for your adult cat.

PetVet strongly recommends annual fecal testing for all cats. If you have an adult cat with no vaccination history, the PetVet veterinarian will likely recommend booster vaccines 3-4 weeks after administration of the initial Adult Cat Pack.

3-in-1 Vaccine

3-in-1 is also known as ‘FVRCP’ Vaccine – and protects against:

• Feline Panleukopenia Virus (AKA Feline Distemper)
Feline Panleukopenia Virus (causative agent of Feline Distemper) is a widespread and highly contagious viral disease that causes fever, vomiting, diarrhea, immune suppression, anemia and death. The virus affects mostly young cats, although cats of any age may be infected. This disease can be fatal in cats of all age groups. Feline Panleukopenia virus does not affect humans or dogs.

Like Canine parvovirus, Feline panleukopenia virus can live for months in the environment. The virus can be brought into a home on hands, clothes, or shoes. Cats that never leave their home or backyard and have no contact with other exposed cats are still at risk.

• Feline Herpesvirus and Feline Calicivirus
Feline Herpesvirus (causative agent of Feline Infectious Rhinotracheitis) and Feline Calicivirus (causative agent of Feline Influenza) are two of the three feline respiratory infections against which the feline 3-in-1 vaccine protects. The clinical signs of these diseases may include runny eyes, runny nose, ulcers of mouth and tongue, coughing, sneezing, fever, pneumonia, loss of appetite, and inactivity. Secondary bacterial infections can be fatal. Infected cats may harbor the organism for life with persistent or recurrent disease.

These diseases are common and are extremely contagious from cat to cat via infected discharges (e.g. mucus) and infected secretions (e.g. saliva and tears). These diseases do not affect humans or dogs.

PureVax Rabies Vaccine

The standard rabies vaccine is effective at preventing rabies virus infection in both dogs and cats. This vaccine has been in existence for many years and is still used in many places for the prevention of rabies in cats. However, while this vaccine has shown very little propensity for causing adverse medical reactions in dogs, there is ample evidence that it can cause cancerous tumors in cats (fibrosarcomas). The chance of a tumor occurring at the injection site is rare, but if it does happen, the prognosis is very poor. Cats that develop these tumors face almost 100% mortality, or may have a limb amputated to avoid spread of the tumor.

Starting in 2010, we started offering the PureVax Feline Rabies vaccine, developed by Merial. This vaccine is non-adjuvanted, meaning it contains less of the various agents believed to cause fibrosarcomas in cats. The PureVax rabies is specifically formulated for cats and has become the standard of care amongst our many veterinary partners. The short term drawback to this vaccine is that it currently is only labeled for one-year use, while the canine vaccine may be given every three years. It is also much more complicated to manufacture, leading to a higher price for pet owners.

The PetVet Medical Advisory Board has determined that this vaccine represents the “best medicine” for cats and as such, PetVet will only make this vaccine available for the prevention of rabies in our feline clients.

Fecal Test

A fecal test is an intestinal parasite screening; it tests for many different types of intestinal parasites including the most common parasites, Coccidia, Giardia, Whipworm, Hookworm and Roundworm.

We receive test results 2-3 business days after submission of the sample. Results are sent by email (if available) and postal mail. In addition, positive results will be followed up with by an automated phone call from our HelpDesk.

Add Feline Leukemia Vaccine – If exposed to outdoor cats

Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is transmitted from cat to cat via saliva and nasal mucus. It is also commonly transmitted directly from an infected mother to her kittens. Cats in direct contact with one another are the most likely to transmit the disease. This virus suppresses a cat’s immune system much like AIDS disease does in humans.

The signs of FeLV are therefore varied and often reflect secondary diseases that develop due to the FeLV-infected cat’s compromised immune system. The most common signs are fever, anemia, appetite loss, and inactivity. Treatment of the disease may help for a while, but it is eventually fatal.

FeLV does not affect people or dogs.

The disease can affect cats of any age but is especially common in the young and the old. Approximately 1 or 2 cats out of any 100 visibly healthy cats have the feline leukemia virus.

Approximately 99% of cats who carry the virus in their bloodstream will die within 5 years of contracting the virus. (Approximately 50% succumb within 6 months.) In other words, a cat with FeLV may appear normal and be contagious to other cats for up to five years after contracting the virus.